ranting/raving

feminism + flowers. And basically everything else. Occasionally (frequently) becomes a Welcome to Night Vale / Orange is the New Black / Twin Peaks appreciation blog.

REPEAT AFTER ME:

disneyforprincesses:

POC existed in Europe during the Medieval era.

POC existed in Europe during the Renaissance.

POC existed in Europe during the 17th century.

POC existed in Europe during the 18th century.

POC existed in Europe.

POC EXISTED IN EUROPE.

POC EXISTED IN EUROPE.

POC EXIST IN EUROPE.

(via theafrocentrics)

— 19 hours ago with 4708 notes
"

Because so much of fantasy takes place in settings that in no way resemble the real world, featuring species that in no way resemble human, fantasy writers often have trouble dealing with regular people. This is something that, I think, isn’t as much of a problem for mainstream writers, because they can simply describe the world around them and come up with a reasonably accurate representation of humanity. They can also fall back on the plethora of real-world terms used to describe human beings, racially and otherwise. But using these terms makes no sense if you’re dealing with a world that doesn’t share our political/cultural context. You can’t call someone “African American” if your world has no Africa, no America, and has never gone through a colonial phase in which people of disparate cultures were forcibly brought together, thus necessitating the term in the first place.

That said, it’s equally illogical to populate your fantasy world with only one flavor of human being, which is what far too many fantasy stories default to. Granted, many fantasies take place in confined cultural spaces — a single small kingdom in a Europeanish milieu, maybe a single city or castle within that city. (But how did that castle get its spices for the royal table, or that lady her silks? What enemy are the knights training to fight? Even in the most monochromatic parts of the real Ye Olde Englande, I can guarantee you there were some Asian traders, Sephardic or Ashkenazic Jewish merchants, Spanish diplomats or nobles partly descended from black Moors, and so on.) I get that lots of countries on Earth are racially homogeneous, so it makes perfect sense that some fantasy settings would be too. But whiteness is the default in our thinking for Earth-specific cultural/political reasons. So while it’s logical for fantasy realms to be homogeneous, it’s not logical for so many of them to be homogeneously white. Something besides logic is causing that.

So. It’s a good idea for all fantasy writers to learn how to describe characters of color. And I think it’s a good idea to learn how to describe those characters in subtle ways, since they can’t always rely on Earth terminology. Now, doing subtle description increases the chance that the reader might misidentify the character racially — and to a degree, I think there’s nothing you can do about that. You’re working against a lifetime of baggage in the reader’s mind. But you can still insert enough cues so that when combined, they’ll get the idea across.

"

N.K. Jemisin, blogging on Describing Characters of Color for Magic District.  (via audreymgonzalez)

I do try.

(via tamorapierce)

(via tamorapierce)

— 1 day ago with 5797 notes

feelknower93:

badoinz:

tread softly, because you tread on my memes

i can’t believe how embarrassed to have printed that word combination i would be in hindsight if i were richard dawkins

(via neptunain)

— 1 day ago with 3094 notes

deodrant:

tumblr kinda forces u to get educated on things bc otherwise u wont be able to participate in or understand dash topics

(Source: rnerrychristmas, via pizza)

— 1 day ago with 248179 notes

rneerkat:

hey are you a bank because you need to leave me a loan

(via bastille)

— 1 day ago with 300801 notes

swingsetindecember:

i wish more people said that being single is normal

and you’re not going to meet and marry someone

and that’s fine

and if marriage happens, it happens. and it’s not the next big ticket to check off in life’s checklist

because not everyone meets someone they want to marry. and that’s normal

you’re not broken or unfulfilled if you are single

(via theuppitynegras)

— 1 day ago with 155005 notes

neptunain:

"is pepsi okay?"

nothing is okay

— 1 day ago with 38 notes
"Forget stardust—you are iron. Your blood is nothing but ferrous liquid. When you bleed, you reek of rust. It is iron that fills your heart and sits in your veins. And what is iron, really, unless it’s forged? You are iron. And you are strong."

n.t. (via thelittle-hobbit)

Damn right you’re iron, and do you know where iron comes from? Do you know how iron gets here? Let me tell you.

It does start with a star, but it’s not some dismal castoff from an eternal beauty, it’s so much more. Everything that makes our world came from stars, but nothing had as much effect on that star as iron.

See the sun burning in the sky? The light you see and the heat you feel are created when the sun fuses elements, the building blocks of our world, into new and heavier elements. The sun lives because more energy comes from that process than is needed to support it.

UNTIL IRON COMES ALONG.

Fusing iron — burning it to make a star shine — is nigh on impossible. Iron is strong and iron is heavy. Iron is so strong and so heavy that to make new elements from iron takes more energy than it produces. The star can’t keep up, it starts to die.

The iron that flows through your veins KILLED A STAR.

Those other metals that we so value, like gold, owe their existence to iron. As the star died it collapsed, crushing itself and making gold and platinum and other precious and powerful things. Then it exploded and scattered those metals throughout space.

Chief among them was iron. The iron whose formation was the death knell of the star. The iron whose intensity made other metals possible. The iron that was the last thing the living star could make.

Stars lived to make iron.

Stars died to make you.

(via noctumsolis)

star-killing space iron is literally me

(via gilgameshwulfenbach)

(via astro-stoner)

— 1 day ago with 102931 notes